Could Cannabis Lube Be the Secret to Enhanced Female Sexual Pleasure?

November 25, 2018

Cannabis Lubrication and Sexual Pleasure

 

Just when I thought I had finally become familiar with all the possible medical uses of cannabis, I came across a few articles touting the benefits of cannabis lube for female orgasm. 

 

Cannabis lubricants and other cannabis-infused sensual aids are on many women’s radars, not to mention going into their nightstand drawers.  But does cannabis really help with women’s sexual health and wellbeing?

 

Anecdotally, Women Say Cannabis Lube Can:

 

  • reduce their stress that, in turn, can facilitate more pleasure.
  • enhance their creativity which could translate to a willingness to try new things.
  • lower inhibitions to get them “out of their head.”
  • increase hormonal production that could ‘open up’ emotions such as passion.
  • ease discomfort and pain, particular during and post menopause.
  • enhance physical sensitivity and sensation and potentially increasing orgasms or orgasm intensity.

 

The Skinny On Cannabis Lube

 

  • It is just as much a relaxation aid as a sexual aid.
  • It takes 20-40 minutes to work.
  • Cannabis oil is an experience in itself. Sex isn’t required, but it certainly makes it better.
  • A lot of cannabis lube formulations should not be used in combination with latex. The oils in the product can cause latex to break down and render your protection useless.

The Basic Breakdown of How Cannabis Lube Works Its Magic:

Isolated Cannabis Bud for making cannabis lube

  1. The mucous membranes present in a woman’s genitals (and there are a lot) absorb the THC in the oil lubricant
  2. The cannabinoids act locally on the cannabinoid receptors.
  3. This causes the capillaries to dilate and increases blood flow to that area.  This causes the lower portion of your body to relax and increases blood flow to all parts of your vaginal.
  4. This enhanced circulation magnifies sensitivity and sensation.

 

Put all those things together and you’ve got a very enjoyable experience.

 

THC absorbed in the vagina technically should not make you feel ‘high’.

 

** Take careful note that if you are using an oil-based lube, they are not compatible with latex or polyisoprene condoms and can degrade any rubber-based sexual aids or accessories. While no substance introduced with condoms is 100% safe for the integrity of the condom material, some product websites claim they should be okay to use with lambskin, polyurethane, or nitrile condoms. 

 

Click Here to Learn More About Cannabis Lube

Growth Hormone – Are You Deficient?

June 1, 2018

The older you are, the harder it is to lose weight. You can eat right, exercise, and cut out sweets, but the scale doesn’t budge. Why? It has a lot to do with your hormones.

 

Hormones play an integral role in health and wellness. They promote growth within the body and influence metabolism, organ function, energy, and weight management. There are many factors that can interfere with hormone production, including aging. As people age, their body may not produce adequate levels of hormones. This creates havoc with your ability to maintain a healthy weight, slowing metabolism and energy levels. And hormone balance can begin to change as early as your 20s.

 

The good news is that you can rebalance your hormone levels with targeted therapies and can effectively manage hormone imbalance.

 

Growth hormone-releasing hormone is a hormone produced in an area of the brain called the hypothalamus. The main role of this hormone is to stimulate the pituitary gland to produce and release growth hormone. Growth hormone acts on virtually every tissue of the body. Growth hormone stimulates production of insulin-like growth factor from the liver and other organs, and this acts in the body to control metabolism and growth. In addition to its effect on growth hormone secretion, growth hormone-releasing hormone also affects sleep, food intake and memory.  

 

If your body produces too little growth hormone-releasing hormone, the production and release of growth hormone from the pituitary gland is impaired.  Adults with growth hormone deficiency may have a wide range of symptoms. The most important consequences of reduced growth hormone levels are changes in body structure (decreased muscle and bone mass and increased body fat), tiredness, being less lively and a poor health-related quality of life.  When these symptoms are severe, they can reduce people’s ability to function – both socially and professionally – and this can dramatically lower the quality of their lives. 

 

Other signs and symptoms include:

  • decrease in the amount of muscle bulk and strength
  • increase in the amount of fat in the body (especially around the waist)
  • abnormalities in the amount of ‘good’ and ‘bad’ cholesterol – this can lead to an increase in the risk of heart disease
  • abnormalities in the blood and in the circulation
  • osteoporosis
  • low energy levels and decreased stamina
  • impaired concentration and memory
  • sleep disturbances 

 

Sermorelin

Sermorelin is a bio-identical synthetic hormone peptide that may be used in conjunction with bio-identical hormone replacement therapy, various weight loss programs and erectile dysfunction treatment.  Sermorelin, a growth hormone-releasing hormone (GHRH), can enhance overall health and well-being by stimulating the production and release of hormones by the pituitary gland. This kick starts your metabolism so that your weight loss efforts are more effective!  It holds the potential to slow the effects of aging in humans by spurring growth of new tissue, muscles and synapses in the brain. It even has the potential to help patients think more clearly.  As you age, your body produces fewer hormones, a phenomenon that is considered one of the principal medical signs of aging. Sermorelin therapy encourages the body to naturally produce hormones. Sermorelin is different from many similar treatments, as it stimulates a natural process rather than requiring patients to directly add hormones to the system – this distinction makes our Sermorelin therapy much less likely to lead to complications.

 

While results may vary from patient to patient, studies have shown that Sermorelin anti-aging treatment can lead to a range of physical and mental benefits, such as:

  • Increased lean body mass
  • Fat reduction – improves the ability to burn fat
  • Improved energy
  • Increased vitality
  • Increased strength
  • Increased endurance
  • Accelerated wound healing – improved recovery and repair from injuries and inflammation
  • Better sleep quality
  • Improved bone density
  • Improved skin quality and higher collagen density
  • Regenerate nerve tissues
  • Strengthen the cardiovascular system
  • Strengthen the immune system
  • Improve cognition and memory
  • Increased sex drive

 

Patient Benefits Over Time

Benefits for patients on Sermorelin shown over the first eight weeks of protocol may include improvements in:

  • Week 1 Quality of sleep
  • Week 2 Recovery from workouts
  • Week 4 Mental clarity
  • Week 6 Skin elasticity
  • Week 8 Body composition

 

Tree of Life Medical is proud to announce Sermorelin for help with reduction of belly fat via lipolysis, boosting energy levels, increasing the skin’s elasticity, elevating endurance levels, promoting speed healing of wounds, ameliorating vision, and promoting deeper sleep. This formula can also strengthen libido in both men and women. Those who have experienced loss of libido are good candidates for therapy. In addition, people who are struggling to control their weight may find it easier to slim down with the help of this formulation.

 

An initial appointment will include a consultation to discuss your health history, your health goals, and review pertinent medical information. Blood tests may be required to determine levels of hormone imbalance and if Sermorelin is right for you.

The IUD – What You Need to Know

May 1, 2018

An IUD is a tiny device that is placed in the uterus to prevent pregnancy. It is long-term, reversible, and one of the most effective birth control methods available.  IUD stands for intrauterine device. It is a small piece of flexible plastic shaped like a T.

 

Types of IUDs

There are 5 different brands of IUDs that are FDA approved in the United States: ParaGard, Mirena, Kyleena, Liletta, and Skyla. These IUDs are divided into 2 types: copper-containing IUDs (ParaGard) and hormone-containing IUDs (Mirena, Kyleena, Liletta, and Skyla).

 

The ParaGard IUD does not have hormones. It is wrapped in copper, and it is effective for up to 12 years.  The Mirena, Kyleena, Liletta, and Skyla IUDs use the hormone progestin to prevent pregnancy. Progestin is very similar to the progesterone. Mirena and Kyleena are effective for up to 5 years. Liletta works for up to 4 years. Skyla works for up to 3 years.

 

How Does the IUD Work?

Both copper IUDs and hormonal IUDs prevent pregnancy by changing the way sperm moves so they can’t get to an egg. If sperm can’t make it to an egg, pregnancy can’t happen.

 

 

The ParaGard IUD uses copper to prevent pregnancy. Sperm is adversely affected by copper, so the ParaGard IUD makes it almost impossible for sperm to get to that egg.

 

 

The hormones in the Mirena, Kyleena, Liletta, and Skyla IUDs prevent pregnancy in two ways.  First, hormones thicken the cervical mucus, which blocks and traps the sperm.  Second, the hormones sometimes stop ovulation, which means there is no egg for a sperm to fertilize. No egg, no pregnancy.

 

 

One of the advantages of IUDs is that they last for years — but they are not permanent. If you decide to get pregnant or you just do not want to have your IUD anymore, it can quickly and easily be removed. You are able to get pregnant immediately after the IUD is removed.

 

IUDs For Emergency Contraception?

The ParaGard (copper) IUD works well as emergency contraception. If you have it placed within 120 hours (5 days) of unprotected sex, it is more than 99.9% effective. It is the most effective way to prevent pregnancy after sex.

 

IUD Effectiveness

IUDs are more than 99% effective. That means fewer than 1 out of 100 women who use an IUD will get pregnant each year. IUDs are effective because there is no chance for you to make a mistake. You cannot forget to take it (like the pill), or use it incorrectly (like condoms). And you are protected for 3-12 years, depending on which kind you get. Once your IUD is in place, you can pretty much forget about it until it expires – just keep track of your insertion and removal date.

 

Do IUDs protect against STDs?

No, IUDs do NOT protect against STDs.

 

Where Do I Get an IUD?

An IUD has to be put in by a healthcare provider.

 

The IUD Insertion

People usually feel slight cramping or pain when the IUD is placed. The pain can be worse for some, but it only lasts for a minute or two.  Some people feel dizzy during or right after the IUD is inserted. You might want to ask someone to come with you to the appointment so you don’t have to drive or go home alone, and to give yourself some time to relax afterward.

 

What To Expect After an IUD Insertion

Most people feel perfectly fine right after an IUD insertion – although some people need to take it easy for a while after the insertion. Heating pads and over-the-counter pain meds can help ease cramps.

 

You may have cramping and spotting after getting an IUD, but this almost always goes away within 6-8 weeks. Hormonal IUDs eventually make periods lighter and less crampy, and periods mights stop completely. Copper IUDs may make periods heavier and cramps worse. For some people, this goes away over time. There is a very small chance that your IUD could slip out of place. It can happen any time, but it is more common during the first 3 months. If your IUD falls out, you are NOT protected from pregnancy, so make sure to go see your doctor, and use condoms or another kind of birth control in the meantime.

 

How soon after getting an IUD can I have sex?

You can have sex as soon as you want after getting an IUD.

 

Who SHOULDN’T Get an IUD?

Most people can use IUDs safely, but there are some conditions that make side effects or complications more likely. You may not be able to get an IUD if you:

  • have certain STD’s or pelvic infection
  • think you might be pregnant
  • have cervical cancer that has not been treated
  • have cancer of the uterus
  • have vaginal bleeding that is not your period
  • have had a pelvic infection after either childbirth or an abortion in the past 3 months

 

 

Additionally, you should not get a ParaGard IUD if you have a copper allergy or a bleeding disorder that makes it hard for your blood to clot.  Very rarely, the size or shape of someone’s uterus makes it hard to place an IUD correctly.

 

Risks of IUD

There are possible risks with an IUD, but serious problems are really rare.

 

The IUD can sometimes slip out of the uterus — it can come all the way out or just a little bit. If this happens, you can get pregnant. If the IUD only comes out part of the way, it has to be removed. It is possible — though extremely unlikely — to get pregnant even if the IUD is in the correct location. If you get pregnant with an IUD in place, there is an increased risk of ectopic pregnancy and other serious health problems.

 

It is possible to get an infection if bacteria get into the uterus when the IUD is inserted. If the infection is not treated, it may affect your chances of getting pregnant in the future.

 

When the IUD is inserted, it could push through the wall of the uterus. If this happens, you could need surgery to remove the IUD. This is very rare.

 

What Warning Signs Should I Know About?

Chances are that you will NOT have problems with your IUD. But it is important to pay attention to your body and how you feel after you get your IUD. Here are the warning signs to watch out for:

  • the length of your IUD string feels shorter or longer than previously
  • you can feel the hard plastic bottom of the IUD coming out through your cervix
  • you think you might be pregnant
  • you have bad cramping, pain, or soreness in your lower abdomen
  • there is recurrent pain or bleeding during sex
  • you get unexplained fever, chills, or have trouble breathing
  • your vaginal discharge is different than normal
  • you have vaginal bleeding that is heavier than usual

 

IUD and Breastfeeding?

Yes, it is safe to use the IUD while you’re breastfeeding.  It should not have any effect on how much milk you produce, and it will not hurt your baby. In fact, the IUD is a great method to use if yo a’re breastfeeding and you do not want to get pregnant.

 

IUD Side Effects

Some people have side effects after getting an IUD. They usually go away in about 3–6 months.  Side effects can include:

  • pain when the IUD is put in
  • cramping or backaches for a few days after the IUD is put in
  • spotting between periods
  • irregular periods
  • heavier periods and worse menstrual cramps (ParaGard)

 

 

Pain medicine can usually help with cramping. If the bleeding or cramping gets worse or does not get better, tell your healthcare provider immediately.

 

IUD Removal

Getting an IUD removed is quick and easy. A healthcare provider gently pulls on the string, and the IUD slips out. You may feel cramping for a minute as it comes out.  There is a small chance that your IUD will not come out easily. If this happens, your healthcare provider may use special instruments to remove it. Very rarely, surgery may be needed.

 

 

You can get your IUD taken out whenever you want. ParaGard should be replaced after 12 years.  Mirena and Kyleena should be replaced after 5 years.  Liletta should be replaced after 4 years.  Skyla should be replaced after 3 years.

 

You should feel completely normal after getting your IUD removed. You may have some spotting. Your period will go back to how it was before you got your IUD.

 

Your fertility goes back to normal right after your IUD is removed.  It is possible to get pregnant right away. If you get your IUD removed and you don’t want to get pregnant, use another method of birth control.

Transgender Health Issues

February 11, 2018

“Transgender” is an umbrella term used to capture the spectrum of gender identity and gender-expression diversity. Gender identity is the internal sense of being male, female, neither or both. Gender expression — often an extension of gender identity — involves the expression of a person’s gender identity through social roles, appearance and behaviors.

 

Transgender persons are at increased risk for certain types of chronic diseases, cancers, and mental health problems.

If you’re a transgender person, don’t avoid seeing a doctor out of fear of a negative encounter. Instead, look for a doctor who is empathetic and respectful of your specific needs. By doing so, your doctor can help identify ways to reduce your risk of health concerns, as well as identify medical conditions and refer you to specialists when necessary.

 

Health Issues to Consider:

#1: Access to Health Care

Transgender persons may avoid medical care for fear of being rejected. Many have been turned away by healthcare providers or had other negative experiences. Not all providers know how to deal with specialized transgender issues. Often, transgender health services are not covered by insurance. For these reasons, transgender persons may not be able to access the care they need.

Transgender persons should find a personal doctor who understands transgender health issues.

#2: Hormones

Hormone therapy is often used to make a transgender person more masculine or feminine. But the use of hormones has risks. Testosterone can damage the liver, especially if taken in high doses or by mouth. Estrogen can increase blood pressure, blood glucose (sugar), and blood clotting. Anti-androgens, such as spironolactone, can lower blood pressure, disturb electrolytes, and dehydrate the body. Hormone use should always be supervised by a doctor.

Transgender persons wishing to use hormones should only do so under the supervision of a doctor who can prescribe an appropriate dose and monitor its effects.

#3: Cancer

Trans men who still have a uterus, ovaries, or breasts are at risk for cancer in these organs. Trans women are at risk for prostate cancer, though this risk is low. Cancers related to use of hormones are rare, but counseling is still needed.

Transgender persons should be screened for cancers of the reproductive organs.

#4: Injectable Silicone

Many transgender persons use silicone injections to enhance their appearance. The injection of silicon by non-medical persons is a dangerous practice that can lead to serious health problems. Silicone, when administered by someone who is not a doctor, can move through the body and disfigure it. Also, silicone injected outside of a healthcare setting is typically not medical grade, may be contaminated, and is often injected using shared needles, which can transmit hepatitis.

Transgender persons need to be counseled about the risks of injecting silicone.

#5: Substance Use

Transgender persons use substances at higher rates compared to others. Substances used include amphetamines including crystal meth, marijuana, ecstasy, and cocaine. Use of these drugs has been linked to higher rates of HIV transmission through impaired decision making during sex. Although the long-term effects of these substances are unknown, evidence suggests that their prolonged use is likely to have serious negative health consequences.

Transgender persons should be screened for substance use and get appropriate education and risk-based counseling.

#6: Depression and Anxiety

Transgender persons have higher rates of depression and anxiety compared to others. These problems are often worse for those who do not have adequate social support or who are unable to express their gender identity. As a result, teenagers and young adults have an increased risk of suicide. However, culturally sensitive mental health services can help prevent and treat these problems.

Transgender persons should be screened for signs and symptoms of depression and anxiety and should seek appropriate mental health services provided as needed.

#7: Sexually Transmitted Diseases (STDs)

Transgender persons are at risk for sexually transmitted diseases. These include infections for which there are effective cures (gonorrhea, chlamydia, syphilis, pubic lice or crabs), as well as those for which treatments are more limited (HIV, hepatitis A, B, or C, human papilloma virus). Safe sex, including the use of barriers, is key to preventing STDs.

Transgender persons who are sexually active should be routinely screened for sexually transmitted diseases.

#8: Alcohol

Studies have shown that transgender persons have higher rates of alcohol abuse and dependence. Although limited alcohol use, such as one drink a day, may not be unhealthy, any use can be a problem for a transgender person with an alcohol related disorder. Alcohol abuse is a common problem among transgender persons and can increase the risk for being injured or becoming the victim of a crime.

All transgender persons should be screened for alcohol dependence and abuse, and alcohol use should be limited.

#9: Tobacco

Transgender persons smoke and use tobacco products at much higher rates than others. This can lead to a number of serious health problems, including heart disease, high blood pressure, lung disease, and lung cancer.

Transgender persons should be screened for tobacco use and offered tobacco cessation programs.

#10: Heart Disease

Transgender persons are often at higher risk for heart disease because of hormone use, smoking, and obesity. All transgender persons should have their blood pressure and cholesterol checked as generally recommended. Also, transgender persons should learn about the signs and symptoms of heart disease and stroke.

Transgender persons should have their blood pressure checked at least once a year and their cholesterol screened at least every five years.

 

Experts recommend that you take steps to protect your health based on your anatomy, regardless of your gender identity or expression. This might include:

 

  • Age-appropriate screening for cervical and breast cancers
  • Age-appropriate screening for prostate cancer
  • Age-appropriate screening for colon cancer
  • Age-appropriate vaccinations
  • Screening for mental health conditions
  • Screening for substance abuse
  • Screening for HIV
  • Screening for hepatitis

 

Additional issues might need to be considered if you have had feminizing or masculinizing hormone therapy or surgery.

Your health is important — regardless of your gender identity or gender expression. If you’re due for a screening or you have health concerns, don’t put off seeing a doctor. Early diagnosis and treatment help promote long-term health.

 

More About Transgender Hormone Health:

Hormone replacement is also often part of the transition process . Many transgender persons experience dysphoria, or psychological distress experienced in relation to the discrepancy between the sex they were assigned at birth and their gender identity. There is a high prevalence of depression, anxiety and suicidal thoughts.

Hormones help align physical characteristics with gender identity. Many individuals find hormone therapy extremely beneficial because it enables them to maintain a physical appearance that more closely matches their gender identity, thus increasing their comfort with their physical appearance and decreasing dysphoria and distress. Research shows that hormone therapy significantly reduces depression, anxiety, and sensitivity, along with feelings of hostility. Additionally, hormone therapy often has the effect of increasing self-esteem and feelings of attractiveness. During gender transition, people who receive hormones typically experience a second puberty, during which secondary sex characteristics change to align with gender identity.  These hormones help to produce characteristics that align with their identity or eliminate characteristics causing distress/dysphoria.

It is essential to remember that it is not possible to choose which characteristics result from hormone therapy, and hormone therapy will affect people in different ways. Because of this, the initiation of hormone therapy can also increase feelings of dysphoria and distress.  Many transgender patients don’t quite know what to expect.  Often the changes experienced as a result of hormones therapy are not the results that patients anticipated or have side effects that were not considered.  For the reason, it is essential to counsel these patients thoroughly before initiating a regimen.

Need a boost?

April 12, 2017
Need a boost?

The natural approach

Not ready to hit the Viagra yet? Thanks to these 10 helpful tips, you may not have to. There are several alternative things you can try help get you and your partner back under the sheets (or wherever else strikes your fancy). And don’t worry, you’re not alone. Sexual dysfunction affects both men and women of all ages. It can happen for a variety of reasons that include chronic illness, stress, and anxiety.

Take a bite out of a forbidden fruit

Little evidence supports the effectiveness of certain foods, but there’s no harm in experimenting. Figs, bananas, and avocados, for example, are considered libido-boosting foods, known as aphrodisiacs. But these foods also provide important vitamins and minerals that can increase blood flow to the genitals and promote a healthy sex life.

Indulge in all things chocolate

Throughout history, chocolate has been a symbol of desire. Not just because of its delicious taste, but because of its power to improve sexual pleasure.
According to one study, chocolate promotes the release of phenylethylamine and serotonin into your body. This can produce some
aphrodisiac and mood-lifting effects. According to another study, the effects of chocolate on sexuality are probably more psychological than biological.

Take your daily herbs

Next time you decide to sit down for a romantic dinner, add a little basil or garlic to your dish. The smell of basil stimulates the senses. Garlic contains high levels of allicin, and increases blood flow. These effects may help men with erectile dysfunction. Ginko biloba, an extract derived from the leaf of the Chinese ginkgo tree, is another herb found to treat antidepressant-induced sexual dysfunction.

Take a tip from Africa

Yohimbine, an alkaloid found in the bark of the West African evergreen, has been known to work as as a natural Viagra. Some studies suggest that Yohimbine bark can help you maintain an erection. It will also enhance the quality of an erection. However, researchers say there is no natural equivalent to match Viagra.

Boost your self-confidence

The way you feel about your body affects the way you feel about sex. An unhealthy diet and lack of exercise may cause you to have a poor self-image. These things can discourage you from having and enjoying sex. You can boost your self-esteem and your sex drive by shifting the focus from your flaws to your attributes. You can also focus on the pleasure experienced during sex.

Stick to one glass of wine

Two glasses of wine might be one too many. Drinking one glass of wine can put you at ease and increase your interest in becoming intimate. But too much alcohol can ruin your ability to perform by affecting erectile function. Too much alcohol can also inhibit your ability to orgasm.

Take time to meditate and relieve stress

No matter how healthy you are, being stressed out is going to affect your sex drive. Women are particularly susceptible to the effects stress can have on one’s sex life. Men, on the other hand, sometimes use sex to relieve stress. And sometimes differences in the approach to sex may cause conflict. To relieve stress, participate in sports activities, practice tai chi, or take a yoga class.

Hit the snooze button

Those with a hectic lifestyle don’t always have the time to get the right amount of sleep. Being busy also makes it difficult to make time for a sex. People who balance work with caring for aging parents or young children are often left exhausted, which can lead to a reduced sex drive. Boost your energy and sex drive by taking naps when you can and eating a healthy diet high in protein and low in carbohydrates.

Keep your relationship in check

After you’ve had an argument with your partner, chances are you’re not in the mood to have sex. For women, sensing emotional closeness is important to sexual intimacy. That means unresolved conflicts can affect your sexual relationship. Communication is essential for building trust. It’s important to prevent resentments from building up.

Consult a doctor

Even if you’re taking a natural approach to boosting your sex drive, it still might be a good idea to talk with your doctor. They can help you identify underlying problems. Your doctor may suggest some strategies for enhancing sexual health. These may include communicating with your partner, making healthy lifestyle choices, and treating underlying medical conditions. Knowing the root of the problem affecting your sex life will make it easier to find a solution.